Romeo and juliet scene 6. Romeo and Juliet Summary (Act 2 Scene 6) 2019-01-10

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Romeo and Juliet Act 3, Scene 3 Translation

romeo and juliet scene 6

The law that threatened death becomes thy friend And turns it to exile—there art thou happy. Like, subscribe and comment on if you'd like to see more lesson created by Nerdstudy! This speech reflects both the impetuous and tragic nature of Romeo's love. Every cat and dog and little mouse, every unworthy creature, that lives in Verona lives in heaven because it can see her. Pleased with the news, the Nurse leaves with Peter. Even though the scene ends with Romeo and Juliet leaving with Lawrence to be married, this hidden warning is likely the most important portent of things to come. But your tears are womanly. Romeo and Juliet can barely keep their hands off each other, even in the presence of a priest.

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Romeo and Juliet Summary (Act 2 Scene 6)

romeo and juliet scene 6

You bring shame to your body, your love, and your mind. Yet the advice Lawrence gives here hints at future difficulties if Romeo and Juliet proceed with their plan to marry. Romeo makes several declarations of his love for Juliet. The love that you swore is just a hollow lie, since you now threaten to kill the love that you vowed to cherish. Young Romeo Montague goes out with his friends to make trouble at a party the Capulets are hosting, but while there he spies the Capulet's daughter Juliet, and falls hopelessly in love with her.


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No Fear Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet: Act 2 Scene 6

romeo and juliet scene 6

In scene five Juliet is impatiently waiting for the Nurse to return with news of her marriage. He explains to Lawrence that even if death were to come for him, as long as Juliet is his, he fears nothing. Being banished from Verona is the same as being banished from the world, and being banished from the world is the same as death. This is the point Lawrence is trying to make with Romeo. As he concludes this thought, in walks Juliet. This neighbour air: this air that we share.


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Romeo and Juliet Act 2, Scene 6

romeo and juliet scene 6

It's likely that their sorrow will make them want to go to sleep, anyway. He tells Romeo that 'These violent delights have violent ends' 2. Romeo believes that not even death can counteract the pleasure he feels in marrying Juliet. Their words express how much passion burns in their breasts, and Lawrence is witness to it. They want to know what he was doing, but Romeo remains closemouthed, not saying anything about Juliet. A lover may bestride the gossamers That idles in the wanton summer air, And yet not fall, so light is vanity.


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Romeo and Juliet, Act II, Scene 6 :

romeo and juliet scene 6

By my holy order, I thought thy disposition better tempered. The Nurse then asks the whereabouts of Juliet's mother, which Juliet complains means the Nurse obviously has the strength to talk about, so why can't she just share the news. Romeo has no concern for any danger that may befall him. In his view, the joy of a minute with Juliet will be greater than all the possible sorrow of any later hours. The friar then warns, These violent delights have violent ends And in their triumph die, like fire and powder, Which, as they kiss, consume Juliet arrives and the Friar takes them into the church to be married. When they meet, as in a kiss, they explode.

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Act 2, Scene 6

romeo and juliet scene 6

Why do you moan so terribly? It begins with Friar Laurence describing the plants and herbs that he grows and the different powers that they hold. Romeo adds that he is ready to face the greatest sorrow of all:. Friar Lawrence takes them off to marry them so they can move on to the highly anticipated honeymoon phase. Is Lawrence trying to warn Romeo that the love that burns brightest, burns shortest? If you loved her as I do and were banished as I am, then you could talk about it. Romeo enters, and Friar Laurence can tell by the costume that Romeo still wears that he has been up all night, so he asks what Romeo has been doing.

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ROMEO AND JULIET, Act 2, Scene 6

romeo and juliet scene 6

They continue goofing around until the Nurse approaches. Or at least that's what the Friar thinks. The wedding is never actually seen in the play. They die in their moment of triumph, just like a spark and gunpowder destroy themselves in an explosion once they touch. Scene three takes place in Friar Laurence's room in the church.


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Romeo and Juliet Act 2, Scene 6 Translation

romeo and juliet scene 6

Romeo and Juliet: Act 2, Scene 6 Language Devices: Friar: A member of any of certain religious orders of men, especially the four mendicant orders. That is something to be happy about. Thy form cries out thou art. Romeo takes this opportunity to proclaim his love for Juliet. Not everyone believes their love to be sincere, and neither family is in favor of the marriage. Heaven is in Verona because this is where Juliet lives.

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Act 2, Scene 6

romeo and juliet scene 6

He is looking at the greater good for the community, trying to end the feud. Wilt thou slay thyself, And slay thy lady that in thy life lives By doing damnèd hate upon thyself? Brain Snack: If you're a fan, you might recognize that quote. But make sure to leave before the watchmen take their positions, because they will stop you before you can escape to Mantua. Benvolio tells Mercutio that Tybalt sent a letter to Romeo challenging him to a duel. She wishes she had sent someone younger and quicker.


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Romeo and Juliet Act 2, Scene 6 Translation

romeo and juliet scene 6

Moving at their current pace only invites trouble. This soliloquy foreshadows the potion he will later give to Juliet. She means that she has to give Romeo as much thanks as Romeo gave her, to even things out. Go, get thee to thy love, as was decreed. O, so light a foot Will ne'er wear out the everlasting flint; 22. They are but beggars that can count their worth, But my true love is grown to such excess I cannot sum up sum of half my wealth.

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